Vijayawada history reveals that Bezawada (Vijayawada) was ruled by King Madhava Varma (Ancestor of Pusapatis of Vizianagaram). The remains of the pre-historic man and society of the Stone Age is found all along the River Krishna, which dominates the landscape of Vijayawada.

The history of Vijayawada is largely shaped by the changes that were brought about in the city by the British rule. The British period was marked by significant growth in the basic infrastructure and facilities in the city. A major project, the Prakasam Barrage was completed and a railway bridge over the River Krishna that connected Guntur City and its district was also constructed. The famous Chinese Huin Tsang had visited this place in 639 A.D. when Buddhism was at its zenith.

Vijayawada is surrounded by the Krishna river on the east and west and the Budameru River on the north. The northern, northwestern, and southwestern parts of the city are covered by a low range of hills, while the central, southwestern and northwestern parts are covered by rich and fertile agriculture lands with three major irrigation canals. The topography of Vijayawada is flat, with a few small to medium-sized hills. The Krishna River runs through the city. These hills are part of the Eastern Ghats cut through by the Krishna river. They have very low elevation compared to the average elevation of the ghats. Three canals originating from the north side of the Prakasham barrage reservoir, Eluru, Bandar and Ryves, run through the city.

conomy The GDP of Vijayawada for 2008 was estimated at Rs 5526 crores. The GDP of Vijayawada was $3 billion (Rs. 18,000 crore) in 2010 and is projected to grow to $17 billion (Rs. 1,02,000 crore) by 2025. The fact that Vijayawada is well connected through rail and road makes it one of the main hubs of commercial activities. The second largest wagon workshop of Indian railways is at Rayanapadu near Vijayawada.